Griset’s HOW A BAD KING BECAME A GOOD ONE*

Posted by jlubans on January 06, 2020

null
Caption: Bad King John: more interested in hunting than governing.

There was once a certain King who did nothing but tyrannise over his people, ruining the rich and maltreating the poor, so that all his subjects, day and night, implored deliverance from his evil rule.
One day, returning from the chase, he called his people together and said, " Good people, I know that during my whole reign I have been a hard and tyrannical master to you, but I assure you that from henceforward you shall live in peace and at ease, and nobody shall dare to oppress you."
The people were overjoyed at this good news, and forbore to pray for the King's death as formerly.
In a word, this Prince made such an alteration in his conduct that he gained the name of "The Just," and every one began to bless the felicity of his reign.
One day one of his courtiers presumed to ask him the reason of so sudden and remarkable a change, and the King replied:
"As I rode hunting the other day, I saw a dog in pursuit of a fox, and when he had overtaken him he bit of one of his feet; however, the fox, lame as he was, managed to escape into a hole.
The dog, not being able to get him out, left him there ; but he had hardly gone a hundred paces, when a man threw a great stone at him and cracked his skull.
At the same instant the man met a horse that trod on his foot and lamed him forever; and soon after the horse's foot stuck so fast between two stones that he broke his leg in trying to get it out.
Then said I to myself, ' Men are used as they use others. Whosoever does that which he ought not to do, receives that which he is not willing to receive.'”
_______
Most remarkable is the king’s decision to announce he was changing his ways.
Imagine any politician doing that? No, I am not talking about the phony contrition, apology, etc while the promised change never happens.
I speak of a sincere commitment to the golden rule and to listen and to work for the people.
Kind John, depicted, was termed a Bad King because he preferred hunting to governing.
So, a step toward self-government, not necessarily a bad thing. Like the frogs who wanted a king who truly would “govern” them, got what they wanted and then some: a frog-munching stork.
I recall one boss who was so full of idea – many good ones - I was happy, nevertheless, when he stayed away from the office – I finally got time to do my own work!

*Source: Aesop's fables by Aesop; Griset, Ernest Henry, 1844-1907
London ; New York : Cassell, Petter, and Galpin 1874

© Copyright John Lubans 2020
« Prev itemNext item »

Comments

No comments yet. You can be the first!

Leave comment