Fables for Leaders includes 100+ short stories of talking animals and trees…. and my ruminations on each. I emphasize the philosophical and ethical aspects in these stories – from across the centuries - to my own on-the-job experiences, - successes and failures - and relate them to our contemporary behavior and decision-making. We relate to stories, we remember stories, and these fable stories may help in thinking through and solving, in untraditional ways, problems on the job.” Whimsical illustrations by international artist and paper cutter, Béatrice Coron, capture the charm of this ancient literature and add to its comprehension and enjoyment. Each entry -in 7 chapters- sets forth the original fable followed by Lubans’ commentary. And, many fable feature a “My Thoughts” space to explore how this fable relates to the reader. The seven chapter heads: “Us and them” “Office politics” “The Organization” “Problems” “Budgeting and strategic planning” “The effective follower” “The effective leader”. Topical sub-heads include: “Perspective makes a difference” “Where is the cooperation?” “Hiring decisions” “Performance appraisal” “Pretenders” “Kindness, loyalty and respect for the boss…or not” “Have you heard of the Tall Poppy?” “Gossip and envy” “Are you leading or am I following?” Etc.



Krylov’s THE CASK*

Posted by jlubans on March 16, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Ye Olde Wooden Cask

NEIGHBOUR, a favor I would ask⁠
 —'Tis no great thing—'tis but a Cask
An empty Cask's not much to lend
Just to accommodate a friend.
When one money wants to borrow.
Then 'tis as well to cry 'To-morrow—
Not just now—I can't indeed—
No cash have I but what I need.'
For he that lends away his purse
May find it to return averse."
The Cask was lent—the Cask came back
Quite sound—at least, without a crack;
But then of oil't had such a snack!
So strong a scent that it quite spoiled
Whatever was poured in. 'Twas boiled.
Was scalded, aired; yet still the taint
Remained matter of complaint.
To cure it was a fruitless task.
And so they burned the infected Cask.

Parents! The lesson of my fable
⁠For you is specially intended.
⁠Deem not defects may be evaded
Imbibed in youth; since naught is able.
When once the evil's taken place,
Early impressions to efface,
Do what we may, they still prevail
And to correct them all our efforts fail.

________________
The epimythium
(the moral at the end of a fable) would have us be careful with whom our darling and dearest children associate. We know our Johnny or Janie would do no wrong; if misdeeds are done, it’s the fault of those friends from the wrong side of the tracks!
Maybe.
Still, there is truth in our fable.
I recall delegating one of our staff to a multi-university program. The planned cooperative result was years overdue; yet the project kept stumbling along, one excused delay after another.
So, to get it over and done with, we sent one of our staff to help out.
Alas, our staffer soon began to echo all the reasons why the project was so far behind. The only cure was more. More of everything: time, money and staff; he’d been, as they say, co-opted or tainted evermore like the borrowed cask.

*Source: Krilov, Fables. Translated from the Russian for Fraser's Magazine.
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More “Fables for Leaders” are only a click away:


And, my 2010 book on democratic workplaces, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019

Krylov's THE ELEPHANT AS GOVERNOR (The Sheep’s Petition)*

Posted by jlubans on March 09, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Detail from a monument to Krylov by Peter Klodt von Urgensburg (1854–55)

AN Elephant was once appointed ruler of a forest.
Now, it is well known that the race of elephants is endowed with great intelligence; but every family has its unworthy scion.
Our Governor was as stout as the rest of his race are, but as foolish as the rest of his race are not.
As to his character, he would not intentionally hurt a fly.
Well, the worthy Governor becomes aware of a petition laid before him by the Sheep, stating that their skins are entirely torn off their backs by the Wolves.
"Oh, rogues!" cries the Elephant, "what a crime! Who gave you leave to plunder?
But the Wolves say,
"Allow us to explain, О father.
Did not you give us leave to take from the Sheep a trifling contribution** for our backs in winter?
It is only because they are stupid sheep that they cry out. They have only a single fleece taken from each of them, but they grumble about giving even that! "
“Well, well," says the Elephant, "take care what you do. I will not permit any one to commit injustice.
As it must be so, take a fleece from each of them.
But do not take from them a single hair besides."

He who has rank and power, but wants sense, however good his heart may be, is sure to do harm.

**ОЬгок—A tax levied on the Russian peasant by his master.

-----------------
This is another version of Krylov’s The Sheep’s Petition.
Herein it’s not a lion but a feckless elephant dispensing injustice. Unlike Krylov’s The Grandee, this elephant does not know his limits.
So, cluelessly he goes along with the wolves and their wicked scheme.
I’ll use this fable on my first day of the “Leadership and Literature” class, April 4, at the University of Latvia.
A few of my discussion questions will dwell on a leader’s self-assessment: How am I doing? What can I be doing better? Who can I turn to for guidance.
If the elephant has an advisor, what is her role? Does she speak up on behalf of the shorned sheep or does she let it be, lest she earn some injustice by speaking the truth?

*Source: Krilof and his fables, by Krylov, Ivan Andreevich, 1768-1844; Ralston, William Ralston Shedden, 1828-1889. Tr. London, 1869

__________
My book, Fables for Leaders is only a click away:


Also, My 2010 book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.


© Copyright John Lubans 2019

Phaedrus’ THE ASS DERIDING THE BOAR*

Posted by jlubans on March 04, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Drawing by Ernest Griset (1874)

Fools often, while trying to raise a silly laugh, provoke others by gross affronts, and cause serious danger to themselves.

An Ass meeting a Boar: “Good morrow to you, brother,” says he.
The other indignantly rejects the salutation, and enquires why he thinks proper to utter such an untruth.
The Ass, with legs crouching down, replies: “If you deny that you are like me, at all events I have something very like your snout.”
The Boar, just on the point of making a fierce attack, suppressed his rage, and said: “Revenge were easy for me, but I decline to be defiled with such dastardly blood.”

_________________
One moralist explains the wisdom behind not responding vengefully: “it takes off something from the reputation of a great soul, when we see it is in the power of a fool to ruffle and unsettle it.”
The boar responds but only on his own terms. Likely, the ass is left sitting on his hind quarters puzzling over the boar’s lofty language.
Foolish speech can be countered with wit; no need to go to war.

*Source: THE COMEDIES OF TERENCE AND THE FABLES OF PHÆDRUS.
TRANSLATED By HENRY THOMAS RILEY, B.A.
TO WHICH IS ADDED A METRICAL TRANSLATION OF PHÆDRUS,
By CHRISTOPHER SMART.
LONDON: GEORGE BELL & SONS, 1887.

__________
My book, Fables for Leaders is only a click away:


Also, My 2010 book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019

Become Spontaneous in Three Days. Guaranteed.

Posted by jlubans on February 26, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Not off to a good start.

Mark Twain is quoted as saying “it usually takes me three weeks to prepare a good impromptu speech.”
Mr. Twain’s drollery is apt. Impromptu, according to Merriam-Webster means something “made, done, or formed on or as if on the spur of the moment.” In other words, spontaneous, unrehearsed.
Most of us fear public speaking. Worse, we fear being asked to deliver impromptu remarks. Given a choice between being caged up with a dozen rats or having to talk off the cuff to a dozen people, I’d take the cage.
Once, when I was a job candidate, I was asked to talk about the issues in our industry. This “request” came from the man who would be my boss were I to get the job and he made it as we entered a full staff meeting. “You wouldn’t mind would you?” he asked.
While I did get off a one liner - re how the stock market report was on the local paper’s comics page – I managed to cobble together a few random thoughts. Kind of like the young lady depicted above.
I did wonder why the boss waylaid me that way. Perhaps so I could display how well organized my mind was.
If anything my remarks showed a certain creative disorganization reminding me of the way I compose written essays.
First I sketch out rough notes and ideas, many irrelevant; second, I edit, add, delete, elaborate concepts and ideas and, thirdly I begin to write a first written draft which I will go over and reflect upon before finishing. It's a messy highly personal process, not something ready for prime time, as they say.
I did not get the job but that was more than OK since I had lost interest and had reservations about this boss. I assume leaders who want people who can “think on their feet” would be OK with followers who can organize clichés and unoriginal ideas into a coherent, yet uninspired statement of issues.
I know of only a few peers who, when asked to, could actually hold forth originally and coherently for 20 or more minutes.
In the spirit of Mark Twain, The Wall Street Journal advises the ambitious among us to be prepared, like a Boy Scout, for the inevitable request for impromptu remarks.
How do you prepare? Figure out what you might be asked and then rehearse a focused answer. Expect to be asked “What do you believe are the most important challenges for us coming up and what would you do about them?”
Have that impromptu talk in your pocket.
According to the WSJ you should have a brief structure in mind when you are asked for off the cuff remarks. “One approach is to state the problem, describe the solution and summarize the benefits. Or, frame your thoughts with the 3 Whats: what, so what, now what?” Create a mental road map — stating the issue or topic, explaining why it matters and laying out next steps.
The 3 Whats are a way to ask yourself questions and to answer them in your remarks.
Be sure, we are told, to express how delighted you are to have the opportunity to talk with this group. Tell them that the sweat on your brow and your knocking knees are signs of excitement, not of anxiety.
In my alluded to interview, I should have remarked that my wide, nervous grin was a sign of how honored I was to be among such an esteemed group.
Sure!
Better, if I can remember to do it, is to turn the tables on the group. Asking them for input on what the issues are can be a useful way to show yourself as a collaborative person, as someone who listens and wants to hear, as someone who involves others in his thinking. Best of all, start a conversation and you may be amazed at how much competent people enjoy being asked for their views.
What I should have done in my interview was to return the favor to the boss. After presenting an array of issues, I should have asked the big cheese for his thoughts; does he have areas that need special emphasis?
Yes, you may embarrass the boss, but then again that person will get the message you know what he was doing by putting you on the spot.
If you believe you have truly been ambushed, well, why would you want to work for an organization or an individual who behaves that way?
Maybe you’ve gotten a sneak preview on how this boss treats people. Interviews go two ways. It’s not just you. You are interviewing the organization and its people.

__________
My book, Fables for Leaders is only a click away:


Also, My 2010 democratic workplace book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019

Innovative Performance Evaluation, the Beer Wheel

Posted by jlubans on February 15, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Beer Performance Appraisal Wheel

Recently, while touring the Deschutes Brewery in Bend, Oregon, our guide pointed out the beer tasting wheel used by a 40 member panel – drawn from the staff – of tasters when rating (whether to sell or not) the various flavors produced by this around-the-clock craft brewery.
Daily, thousands of bottles and cans are filled, crated and shipped all over America's Pacific Northwest.
Daily, hundreds of kegs are trucked to bars and restaurants.
The tasting wheel reminded me of an organizational ritual that occurs around this time of year: the annual performance appraisal!
What if we gave supervisors (those doing the ratings) a wheel like this to describe what’s good or not so good about their direct reports. A form of crib sheet like used by teachers in preparing home reports on how Johnny is doing or not doing in school.
No, I am not suggesting a dittoing of the wheel’s terms, like the off-flavor “acetaldehyde” (green apples). Then again, maybe I am!
Surely we could borrow many of the terms to move away from the clichéd and meaningless and to enlarge upon our laconic rating scales: meets expectations (IOW, we have our eye on you, but it is not for promotion), exceeds expectations, far exceeds expectations (a self-actualized person!) and, at the bottom, does not meet expectations, ranging from a five point to ten point scale with liberal decimalization in-between depending on the fussiness of the organization’s culture.
First, a positive word about using those people doing the work in evaluating what they produce. Not long ago, beer assessments were left to designated tasters, those who specialize in quality control or maybe just the brew master. While these people still have an important role, the idea of enlarging the tasting pool makes perfect sense – it’s a form of letting go, a necessary step in leadership if competent people are to do their best job.
One of the earliest business essays on worker involvement in decision-making appeared in the Harvard Business Review as "How I Learned To Let My Workers Lead”. More a personal testament than one of HBRs patented survey articles with 50,000 participants, this essay is about one man’s decision to share decision-making in a sausage factory.
He let the workers taste the sausage; no longer was he the lone taster! According to him, everything got better. I can well believe it.
Back to the wheel;
I see using terms like these to describe staff and performance. My favorites are followed by an exclamation point.
Under TASTE – in the wheel - appears a sub category: “Mouthfeel”
Under that term there’s
Warming!
Carbonation (gassy or flat)
Astringent
Metallic
Mouth coating
Alkaline
Bitter!
Salty
Again, for TASTE, there’s “Oxidized” or “Stale”.
Descriptors include:
Moldy!
Leathery
Papery
Catty!
Under the broad term of ODOR, these terms apply:
Aromatic!
Nutty!
Cereal
Roasted
Phenolic (band aids)
Fatty
Sulfury.
Need to define aromatic? No problem:
Alcoholic
Solvent-like
Estery (another solvent-like off flavor)
Fruity!
Acetaldehyde
Floral!
Hoppy!
Use the terms that fit your high and low performers. Make up new ones. Give it a go.

__________
My book, Fables for Leaders is only a click away:


Also, My 2010 democratic workplace book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019

Phaedrus’ THE TREES UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE GODS*

Posted by jlubans on February 07, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: An ancient olive tree in Sicily.

The Gods in days of yore made choice of such Trees as they wished to be under their protection.
The Oak pleased Jupiter, the Myrtle Venus, the Laurel Phœbus, the Pine Cybele, the lofty Poplar Hercules.
Minerva, wondering why they had chosen the barren ones, enquired the reason.
Jupiter answered: “That we may not seem to sell the honor for the fruit.” “Now, so heaven help me,” said she, “let any one say what he likes, but the Olive is more pleasing to me on account of its fruit.”
Then said the Father of the Gods and the Creator of men:
“O daughter, it is with justice that you are called wise by all; unless what we do is useful, vain is our glory.”

This little Fable admonishes us to do nothing that is not profitable.
___________
While there's much to be said
for the decorative, there’s as much or more for the productive. We need both what’s pleasing to the eye and what’s nourishing to the rest of the body.
While appearances have never been my strong suit, I do understand that when I’m meeting people for the first time, I should not let a mismatched pair of socks or a soup-stained tie give the wrong impression.
I knew one man who never altered his look: black leather jacket and jeans. And he smoked like the proverbial chimney.
No doubt an eye catcher and off putting to some, but what he offered was an unparalleled understanding of the Internet and where it might be going. I wonder how he is doing.

*Source: THE COMEDIES OF TERENCE AND THE FABLES OF PHÆDRUS.
TRANSLATED By HENRY THOMAS RILEY, B.A.
TO WHICH IS ADDED A METRICAL TRANSLATION OF PHÆDRUS,
By CHRISTOPHER SMART.
LONDON: GEORGE BELL & SONS, 1887.

__________
My book, Fables for Leaders is only a click away:


Also, My 2010 democratic workplace book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019

Musical Democracy: “Say(ing) No a Lot”

Posted by jlubans on January 30, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: R.E.M. (Michael Stipe, Peter Buck, Mike Mills), looking askance at lead rocker Homer Simpson

A rocker’s guide to management” is a lengthy and engaging exploration of how rock bands - known more for debauchery than strategic planning - run their businesses or not. The author found four models:
Friends (“We can work it out”)
Autocracies (“I won’t back down”)
Democracies (“Everybody hurts”)
Frenemies (“It’s only rock ’n’ roll”)
How effective are these models? On a yardstick of years together or longevity (and financial success), it appears that the democratic model has a good record, perhaps better than the other three.
But, the author seems to favor the Rolling Stones’ model (it’s only business) since they are still making money and still together, however spuriously and speciously. How many more times is Keith going to fall out of a tree before hanging it up?
A highly autocratic example, Bruce Springsteen and his E Street band have done well and have stayed together. Bruce, a top-downer, says the longevity is because he is the boss, capiche?
Steve Jobs, it is said, rescued Apple, singlehandedly and autocratically.
Yet, many top down organizations collapse or fare poorly because the boss micromanages and may be a bit of a jerk. Some top-downers resent strong followers and prefer Yes-men or Sheep. The more of the latter types, the less innovation or anticipation of trends, the less energy to improve.
How many micro-managers have I known? Many and in my traditional field of work a few were exalted – if you do not count unrealized hopes and dreams - as having leadership qualities which in truth they never had.
There are forces at play with any group of people working together or with any way they choose or not to organize.
Take the Open Systems model with it inputs and outputs and equilibrium and entropy – the flying apart of the organization as it winds down to its inevitable dissolution.
Think Apple will be here forever? Think Facebook or Twitter will? Likely not.
Group theory purports that human groups go through phases of development: form, storm, norm and perform and finally, to adjourn.
Yes, all groups go through the development steps but there are variations at each step and we do not know outcomes: good, better, best or indifferent?
I’ve long held that the more a group evades “storming” – confronting openly the fears and reservations of each member - the less likely you will be able to trust each other and become high performing.
If you look at group development as a sigmoid curve, you would see that while all groups have a growth curve, many curves are mighty shallow while a few, magically, live large.
Some garage bands stay in the garage, only called out for the local July 4th fest.
We’re told that “… R.E.M. operated as an Athenian democracy.” Albeit a tiny one with four founders/principals and then, after 1997, only 3.
In any case, “They all had equal say. There was no pecking order.” This was not majority rule: “Everyone had a veto, which meant everyone had to buy into every decision, business or art. They hashed things out until they reached a consensus. And they said ‘No’ a lot.”
Money talks: R.E.M.’s flat governance structure was an egalitarian economic one. “There were very simple rules: you share all your publishing ($) and you don't fight about petty things and it's democratic. Everybody gets a veto vote, not just the singer."
In other words, R.E.M. put into effect the wishful notion “of the people, by the people and for the people.”
Eccentric or overly idealistic? Not for this band. In 2011, R.E.M made the group decision that it was time to stop touring and making records; yet it lives on, and the members remain friends.
Give the democratic workplace a try.

__________
My book, Fables for Leaders is only a click away:


Also, My 2010 book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019

Phaedrus' “THE WOMAN IN LABOUR”*

Posted by jlubans on January 23, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

No one returns with good will to the place which has done him a mischief.
Her months completed, a Woman in labour lay upon the ground, uttering woeful moans.
Her Husband entreated her to lay her body on the bed, where she might with more ease deposit her ripe burden.
“I feel far from confident,” said she, “that my pains can end in the place where they originated.”
________
Alas, this one did not make it into the Children's Classics of Aesop’s Fables by L'Estrange (1692) more recently published by Knopf in a beautiful hard cover series, the Everyman’s Library.
Imagine the titters from the little ones had it been included, as several rather outré ones were.
For example, there’s L'Estrange’s “JUPITER AND MODESTY” which speaks of “ carnal love” and, his AN APE “(bare-arse”) AND A FOX
Last but not least, there's the pissing donkeys fable certain to prompt a wave of giggling in the nursery?
I can relate to the promythium moral, “one does not return with good will to the place which has done him a mischief”.
An institution with which I parted ways, involuntarily, did not see me back for 15 years and then only because one of my students arranged a tour. I went for an hour and that was the end of it.
While nothing like giving birth, some say getting the boot at work stays with you for a long, long time with nothing to show for it, unlike a sweet, darling child.

*Source: THE COMEDIES OF TERENCE AND THE FABLES OF PHÆDRUS.
TRANSLATED By HENRY THOMAS RILEY, B.A.
TO WHICH IS ADDED A METRICAL TRANSLATION OF PHÆDRUS,
By CHRISTOPHER SMART.
LONDON: GEORGE BELL & SONS, 1887.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019


How Jerks Happen

Posted by jlubans on January 18, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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While working on my Fulbright sponsored class, Literature and Leadership, I came across an intriguing essay,
The Dark Triad and the Evolution of Jerks
The author, a psychology professor, wonders how jerks thrive.
Most of us, perhaps up to 90%, try to live our lives according to the golden rule: treat others as you want to be treated. When attacked, we are cautioned to “turn the other cheek”.
So, how do we get jerks, those habitués of the Dark Triad?
The class will make use of my book, Fables for Leaders. As fables go, many are stories about jerks and offer examples and advice.
For example, there’s the fable of "The Travelers and the Purse"
in which one of the two travelers claims full ownership of money the two find on the road, (my good fortune, not our good fortune). When threatened by an approaching posse, the jerk reneges on his claim of exclusive ownership.
And there’s, “A Hedge-hog and a Snake”, about an unwanted guest who ousts the hospitable Hedge-hog from his nest.
Even better, there's Aesop and the Stone in which an injured Aesop tricks the perp into a much graver folly, likely leading to his death.
And, finally, there’s
The Weeping Man and the Birds” about how a man who “weeps” crocodile tears while slaughtering birds for the cooking pot.
Here’s what’s in the Dark Triad: “Narcissism (an excessive focus on oneself), Machiavellianism (manipulating others for one’s own gain), and psychopathy (an overall disregard for others).”
Looking for more information about the dark triad, I discovered that there are tests you can take to find out if you are one of them. Please note that I question the credibility of these tests. Who –when kindness and cooperation are what set most humans apart from other living creatures - would agree with any of these following beliefs/behaviors?
It's true that I can be mean to others.
I know that I am special because everyone keeps telling me so.
Most people can be manipulated.
Hurting people would be exciting.
I enjoy having sex with people I hardly know.
Payback needs to be quick and nasty (see above, "Aesop and the Stone").
I like to get revenge on authorities.
I’ll say anything to get what I want.
Make sure your plans benefit you not others.

If you strongly concur with these statements, then you are probably reading this in a jail cell or lolling in the lap of luxury as the jefe of a drug gang.
Or, if you have more than an occasional lapse or two (“To err is human”, after all), and routinely apply these behaviors to get ahead at work, you are more than likely One Big Fat Jerk (OBFJ) a new type for the Myers Briggs Type Indicator!
So, if most of us value kindness and cooperation, how does the dark side thrive?
Well, according to research, unkind people adapt and use trickery to make gains and to survive against the kind folks they encounter and abuse.
Is it nature or nurture one might ask? Do big jerks beget little jerks?
Some of the dark behavior is what it takes to survive under bad conditions. And one might ask realistically, if it is permissible to fight a jerk with jerk behaviors? That question should make for some interesting class discussion about effective leadership and followership.

____________
My 2010 book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019

Phaedrus’ Fable X. OF THE VICES OF MEN*

Posted by jlubans on January 04, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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Jupiter has loaded us with a couple of Wallets: the one, filled with our own vices, he has placed at our backs, the other, heavy with those of others, he has hung before.

From this circumstance, we are not able to see our own faults: but as soon as others make a slip, we are ready to censure.

_________
This quintessential fable also appears on p. 74 in my “Fables for Leaders” as Jupiter and the Two Sacks.
If there ever was a must-read fable for leaders it is this one.
Our willingness to blame others instead of ourselves was observed millennia ago. The flaw is nothing new. If noted, it was not revealed by Freud, Psychology Today or Dr. Phil.
In a very few words, Aesop/Phaedrus show us man’s seeming inability to look beyond self and “to walk in another person’s moccasins”. A bit of Native American wisdom, there, at the end.
Yet, in corporate suites and the cubicles of the not-for-profit the annual ritual of performance appraisal is celebrated by the master over the servant.
Far better to have a humble conversation on one’s dreams and aspirations than to seek to reduce an individual to a decimal or letter of the alphabet.

*Source: THE COMEDIES OF TERENCE AND THE FABLES OF PHÆDRUS.
TRANSLATED By HENRY THOMAS RILEY, B.A.
TO WHICH IS ADDED A METRICAL TRANSLATION OF PHÆDRUS,
By CHRISTOPHER SMART.
LONDON: GEORGE BELL & SONS, 1887.


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Caption: Maybe Phaedrus, more likely Aesop.

**Who was Phaedrus?
Gaius Julius Phaedrus was born BC 15 and died AD 50 in Italy. Born a slave, he became a free man in the Emperor Augustus household and was educated in Greek and Latin authors.
He enlarged upon the Aesopic tradition and invented fables of his own
He did much to promote the fable literature, achieving a great popularity, we are told, in the Middle Ages.

____________
My 2010 book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019