Fables for Leaders includes 100+ short stories of talking animals and trees…. and my ruminations on each. I emphasize the philosophical and ethical aspects in these stories – from across the centuries - to my own on-the-job experiences, - successes and failures - and relate them to our contemporary behavior and decision-making. We relate to stories, we remember stories, and these fable stories may help in thinking through and solving, in untraditional ways, problems on the job.” Whimsical illustrations by international artist and paper cutter, Béatrice Coron, capture the charm of this ancient literature and add to its comprehension and enjoyment. Each entry -in 7 chapters- sets forth the original fable followed by Lubans’ commentary. And, many fable feature a “My Thoughts” space to explore how this fable relates to the reader. The seven chapter heads: “Us and them” “Office politics” “The Organization” “Problems” “Budgeting and strategic planning” “The effective follower” “The effective leader”. Topical sub-heads include: “Perspective makes a difference” “Where is the cooperation?” “Hiring decisions” “Performance appraisal” “Pretenders” “Kindness, loyalty and respect for the boss…or not” “Have you heard of the Tall Poppy?” “Gossip and envy” “Are you leading or am I following?” Etc.



Innovative Performance Evaluation, the Beer Wheel

Posted by jlubans on February 15, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Beer Performance Appraisal Wheel

Recently, while touring the Deschutes Brewery in Bend, Oregon, our guide pointed out the beer tasting wheel used by a 40 member panel – drawn from the staff – of tasters when rating (whether to sell or not) the various flavors produced by this around-the-clock craft brewery.
Daily, thousands of bottles and cans are filled, crated and shipped all over America's Pacific Northwest.
Daily, hundreds of kegs are trucked to bars and restaurants.
The tasting wheel reminded me of an organizational ritual that occurs around this time of year: the annual performance appraisal!
What if we gave supervisors (those doing the ratings) a wheel like this to describe what’s good or not so good about their direct reports. A form of crib sheet like used by teachers in preparing home reports on how Johnny is doing or not doing in school.
No, I am not suggesting a dittoing of the wheel’s terms, like the off-flavor “acetaldehyde” (green apples). Then again, maybe I am!
Surely we could borrow many of the terms to move away from the clichéd and meaningless and to enlarge upon our laconic rating scales: meets expectations (IOW, we have our eye on you, but it is not for promotion), exceeds expectations, far exceeds expectations (a self-actualized person!) and, at the bottom, does not meet expectations, ranging from a five point to ten point scale with liberal decimalization in-between depending on the fussiness of the organization’s culture.
First, a positive word about using those people doing the work in evaluating what they produce. Not long ago, beer assessments were left to designated tasters, those who specialize in quality control or maybe just the brew master. While these people still have an important role, the idea of enlarging the tasting pool makes perfect sense – it’s a form of letting go, a necessary step in leadership if competent people are to do their best job.
One of the earliest business essays on worker involvement in decision-making appeared in the Harvard Business Review as "How I Learned To Let My Workers Lead”. More a personal testament than one of HBRs patented survey articles with 50,000 participants, this essay is about one man’s decision to share decision-making in a sausage factory.
He let the workers taste the sausage; no longer was he the lone taster! According to him, everything got better. I can well believe it.
Back to the wheel;
I see using terms like these to describe staff and performance. My favorites are followed by an exclamation point.
Under TASTE – in the wheel - appears a sub category: “Mouthfeel”
Under that term there’s
Warming!
Carbonation (gassy or flat)
Astringent
Metallic
Mouth coating
Alkaline
Bitter!
Salty
Again, for TASTE, there’s “Oxidized” or “Stale”.
Descriptors include:
Moldy!
Leathery
Papery
Catty!
Under the broad term of ODOR, these terms apply:
Aromatic!
Nutty!
Cereal
Roasted
Phenolic (band aids)
Fatty
Sulfury.
Need to define aromatic? No problem:
Alcoholic
Solvent-like
Estery (another solvent-like off flavor)
Fruity!
Acetaldehyde
Floral!
Hoppy!
Use the terms that fit your high and low performers. Make up new ones. Give it a go.

__________
My book, Fables for Leaders is only a click away:


Also, My 2010 democratic workplace book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019

Phaedrus’ THE TREES UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE GODS*

Posted by jlubans on February 07, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: An ancient olive tree in Sicily.

The Gods in days of yore made choice of such Trees as they wished to be under their protection.
The Oak pleased Jupiter, the Myrtle Venus, the Laurel Phœbus, the Pine Cybele, the lofty Poplar Hercules.
Minerva, wondering why they had chosen the barren ones, enquired the reason.
Jupiter answered: “That we may not seem to sell the honor for the fruit.” “Now, so heaven help me,” said she, “let any one say what he likes, but the Olive is more pleasing to me on account of its fruit.”
Then said the Father of the Gods and the Creator of men:
“O daughter, it is with justice that you are called wise by all; unless what we do is useful, vain is our glory.”

This little Fable admonishes us to do nothing that is not profitable.
___________
While there's much to be said
for the decorative, there’s as much or more for the productive. We need both what’s pleasing to the eye and what’s nourishing to the rest of the body.
While appearances have never been my strong suit, I do understand that when I’m meeting people for the first time, I should not let a mismatched pair of socks or a soup-stained tie give the wrong impression.
I knew one man who never altered his look: black leather jacket and jeans. And he smoked like the proverbial chimney.
No doubt an eye catcher and off putting to some, but what he offered was an unparalleled understanding of the Internet and where it might be going. I wonder how he is doing.

*Source: THE COMEDIES OF TERENCE AND THE FABLES OF PHÆDRUS.
TRANSLATED By HENRY THOMAS RILEY, B.A.
TO WHICH IS ADDED A METRICAL TRANSLATION OF PHÆDRUS,
By CHRISTOPHER SMART.
LONDON: GEORGE BELL & SONS, 1887.

__________
My book, Fables for Leaders is only a click away:


Also, My 2010 democratic workplace book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019

Musical Democracy: “Say(ing) No a Lot”

Posted by jlubans on January 30, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: R.E.M. (Michael Stipe, Peter Buck, Mike Mills), looking askance at lead rocker Homer Simpson

A rocker’s guide to management” is a lengthy and engaging exploration of how rock bands - known more for debauchery than strategic planning - run their businesses or not. The author found four models:
Friends (“We can work it out”)
Autocracies (“I won’t back down”)
Democracies (“Everybody hurts”)
Frenemies (“It’s only rock ’n’ roll”)
How effective are these models? On a yardstick of years together or longevity (and financial success), it appears that the democratic model has a good record, perhaps better than the other three.
But, the author seems to favor the Rolling Stones’ model (it’s only business) since they are still making money and still together, however spuriously and speciously. How many more times is Keith going to fall out of a tree before hanging it up?
A highly autocratic example, Bruce Springsteen and his E Street band have done well and have stayed together. Bruce, a top-downer, says the longevity is because he is the boss, capiche?
Steve Jobs, it is said, rescued Apple, singlehandedly and autocratically.
Yet, many top down organizations collapse or fare poorly because the boss micromanages and may be a bit of a jerk. Some top-downers resent strong followers and prefer Yes-men or Sheep. The more of the latter types, the less innovation or anticipation of trends, the less energy to improve.
How many micro-managers have I known? Many and in my traditional field of work a few were exalted – if you do not count unrealized hopes and dreams - as having leadership qualities which in truth they never had.
There are forces at play with any group of people working together or with any way they choose or not to organize.
Take the Open Systems model with it inputs and outputs and equilibrium and entropy – the flying apart of the organization as it winds down to its inevitable dissolution.
Think Apple will be here forever? Think Facebook or Twitter will? Likely not.
Group theory purports that human groups go through phases of development: form, storm, norm and perform and finally, to adjourn.
Yes, all groups go through the development steps but there are variations at each step and we do not know outcomes: good, better, best or indifferent?
I’ve long held that the more a group evades “storming” – confronting openly the fears and reservations of each member - the less likely you will be able to trust each other and become high performing.
If you look at group development as a sigmoid curve, you would see that while all groups have a growth curve, many curves are mighty shallow while a few, magically, live large.
Some garage bands stay in the garage, only called out for the local July 4th fest.
We’re told that “… R.E.M. operated as an Athenian democracy.” Albeit a tiny one with four founders/principals and then, after 1997, only 3.
In any case, “They all had equal say. There was no pecking order.” This was not majority rule: “Everyone had a veto, which meant everyone had to buy into every decision, business or art. They hashed things out until they reached a consensus. And they said ‘No’ a lot.”
Money talks: R.E.M.’s flat governance structure was an egalitarian economic one. “There were very simple rules: you share all your publishing ($) and you don't fight about petty things and it's democratic. Everybody gets a veto vote, not just the singer."
In other words, R.E.M. put into effect the wishful notion “of the people, by the people and for the people.”
Eccentric or overly idealistic? Not for this band. In 2011, R.E.M made the group decision that it was time to stop touring and making records; yet it lives on, and the members remain friends.
Give the democratic workplace a try.

__________
My book, Fables for Leaders is only a click away:


Also, My 2010 book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019

Phaedrus' “THE WOMAN IN LABOUR”*

Posted by jlubans on January 23, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

No one returns with good will to the place which has done him a mischief.
Her months completed, a Woman in labour lay upon the ground, uttering woeful moans.
Her Husband entreated her to lay her body on the bed, where she might with more ease deposit her ripe burden.
“I feel far from confident,” said she, “that my pains can end in the place where they originated.”
________
Alas, this one did not make it into the Children's Classics of Aesop’s Fables by L'Estrange (1692) more recently published by Knopf in a beautiful hard cover series, the Everyman’s Library.
Imagine the titters from the little ones had it been included, as several rather outré ones were.
For example, there’s L'Estrange’s “JUPITER AND MODESTY” which speaks of “ carnal love” and, his AN APE “(bare-arse”) AND A FOX
Last but not least, there's the pissing donkeys fable certain to prompt a wave of giggling in the nursery?
I can relate to the promythium moral, “one does not return with good will to the place which has done him a mischief”.
An institution with which I parted ways, involuntarily, did not see me back for 15 years and then only because one of my students arranged a tour. I went for an hour and that was the end of it.
While nothing like giving birth, some say getting the boot at work stays with you for a long, long time with nothing to show for it, unlike a sweet, darling child.

*Source: THE COMEDIES OF TERENCE AND THE FABLES OF PHÆDRUS.
TRANSLATED By HENRY THOMAS RILEY, B.A.
TO WHICH IS ADDED A METRICAL TRANSLATION OF PHÆDRUS,
By CHRISTOPHER SMART.
LONDON: GEORGE BELL & SONS, 1887.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019


How Jerks Happen

Posted by jlubans on January 18, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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While working on my Fulbright sponsored class, Literature and Leadership, I came across an intriguing essay,
The Dark Triad and the Evolution of Jerks
The author, a psychology professor, wonders how jerks thrive.
Most of us, perhaps up to 90%, try to live our lives according to the golden rule: treat others as you want to be treated. When attacked, we are cautioned to “turn the other cheek”.
So, how do we get jerks, those habitués of the Dark Triad?
The class will make use of my book, Fables for Leaders. As fables go, many are stories about jerks and offer examples and advice.
For example, there’s the fable of "The Travelers and the Purse"
in which one of the two travelers claims full ownership of money the two find on the road, (my good fortune, not our good fortune). When threatened by an approaching posse, the jerk reneges on his claim of exclusive ownership.
And there’s, “A Hedge-hog and a Snake”, about an unwanted guest who ousts the hospitable Hedge-hog from his nest.
Even better, there's Aesop and the Stone in which an injured Aesop tricks the perp into a much graver folly, likely leading to his death.
And, finally, there’s
The Weeping Man and the Birds” about how a man who “weeps” crocodile tears while slaughtering birds for the cooking pot.
Here’s what’s in the Dark Triad: “Narcissism (an excessive focus on oneself), Machiavellianism (manipulating others for one’s own gain), and psychopathy (an overall disregard for others).”
Looking for more information about the dark triad, I discovered that there are tests you can take to find out if you are one of them. Please note that I question the credibility of these tests. Who –when kindness and cooperation are what set most humans apart from other living creatures - would agree with any of these following beliefs/behaviors?
It's true that I can be mean to others.
I know that I am special because everyone keeps telling me so.
Most people can be manipulated.
Hurting people would be exciting.
I enjoy having sex with people I hardly know.
Payback needs to be quick and nasty (see above, "Aesop and the Stone").
I like to get revenge on authorities.
I’ll say anything to get what I want.
Make sure your plans benefit you not others.

If you strongly concur with these statements, then you are probably reading this in a jail cell or lolling in the lap of luxury as the jefe of a drug gang.
Or, if you have more than an occasional lapse or two (“To err is human”, after all), and routinely apply these behaviors to get ahead at work, you are more than likely One Big Fat Jerk (OBFJ) a new type for the Myers Briggs Type Indicator!
So, if most of us value kindness and cooperation, how does the dark side thrive?
Well, according to research, unkind people adapt and use trickery to make gains and to survive against the kind folks they encounter and abuse.
Is it nature or nurture one might ask? Do big jerks beget little jerks?
Some of the dark behavior is what it takes to survive under bad conditions. And one might ask realistically, if it is permissible to fight a jerk with jerk behaviors? That question should make for some interesting class discussion about effective leadership and followership.

____________
My 2010 book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019

Phaedrus’ Fable X. OF THE VICES OF MEN*

Posted by jlubans on January 04, 2019  •  Leave comment (0)

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Jupiter has loaded us with a couple of Wallets: the one, filled with our own vices, he has placed at our backs, the other, heavy with those of others, he has hung before.

From this circumstance, we are not able to see our own faults: but as soon as others make a slip, we are ready to censure.

_________
This quintessential fable also appears on p. 74 in my “Fables for Leaders” as Jupiter and the Two Sacks.
If there ever was a must-read fable for leaders it is this one.
Our willingness to blame others instead of ourselves was observed millennia ago. The flaw is nothing new. If noted, it was not revealed by Freud, Psychology Today or Dr. Phil.
In a very few words, Aesop/Phaedrus show us man’s seeming inability to look beyond self and “to walk in another person’s moccasins”. A bit of Native American wisdom, there, at the end.
Yet, in corporate suites and the cubicles of the not-for-profit the annual ritual of performance appraisal is celebrated by the master over the servant.
Far better to have a humble conversation on one’s dreams and aspirations than to seek to reduce an individual to a decimal or letter of the alphabet.

*Source: THE COMEDIES OF TERENCE AND THE FABLES OF PHÆDRUS.
TRANSLATED By HENRY THOMAS RILEY, B.A.
TO WHICH IS ADDED A METRICAL TRANSLATION OF PHÆDRUS,
By CHRISTOPHER SMART.
LONDON: GEORGE BELL & SONS, 1887.


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Caption: Maybe Phaedrus, more likely Aesop.

**Who was Phaedrus?
Gaius Julius Phaedrus was born BC 15 and died AD 50 in Italy. Born a slave, he became a free man in the Emperor Augustus household and was educated in Greek and Latin authors.
He enlarged upon the Aesopic tradition and invented fables of his own
He did much to promote the fable literature, achieving a great popularity, we are told, in the Middle Ages.

____________
My 2010 book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019

FIDO

Posted by jlubans on December 28, 2018  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Ruffin McNeill (L) with OU’s Head Coach. Lincoln Riley. Interestingly, Mr. McNeill was Mr. Riley’s boss at East Carolina University.

I first heard “FIDO” in a post Vietnam War song sung by Johnny Cash: Forget it, “Drive on – It don’t mean nothin’, drive on”. FIDO for short.
More recently, I heard it during the 2018 football season, American football.
FIDO means make a mistake, learn from it and move on. In other words, don’t dwell on it so much you wind up doubting yourself. It’s a favorite refrain for Ruffin McNeill, Assistant Head Coach and Defensive Coordinator at the #4 ranked University of Oklahoma.
N. B. In case you agree with the snide sports writer that FIDO is just another clichéd business term, like a Wal-Mart motivational poster, do consider the context in which it is applied and used.
Mr. McNeill took over coaching OUs defensive platoon in mid season after an upset loss to the University of Texas Longhorns team.
He was hired to instill confidence (belief in self) and to ameliorate self-doubt. Is not communicating trust and confidence a leader’s key role?
In American football, the offense - the 11-member team that has the ball - is composed of different players from those on the defensive "eleven" that tries to stop the other team’s offense.
Unlike OUs number one ranked offense, the defense has been much criticized. One kindly writer called it “porous”.
Complicating this is the new strategy of “spreading the field” - distributing players far apart so there’s more acreage to defend. If defense is “porous” on both teams then some games devolve into what are called, “shoot outs”, with 50 points each team!
Most American football games finish in the low 20s.
Since Mr. McNeill’s been in charge of the defense (coaching and anticipating what the other team might do), there’s been some noticeable improvement.
While the OU offense continues to rack up touchdowns the defense has tackled better, and has made some momentum-swinging interceptions and forced fumbles.
Mr. McNeill – ever mindful of the importance of player confidence – attributes the improvements to the FIDO mantra.
Do your best. When you make a mistake or the other team does something brilliant, forget it and drive on and do better the next time.
If you do something brilliant, savor it, then move on to the next play.
Mr. McNeill’s confidence in his players is evident in his demeanor.
In the Big12 championship game, when an OU defender sacked the Texas quarterback in the end zone for a game changing “safety” (2 points for OU), TV cameras showed McNeill's reaction to the play, “except there was no reaction — not even the slightest of smiles or fist pumps.” He was saying by not saying, “No surprise! It’s what I know you can do. Now move on.”
His predecessor, Mike Stoops, was far more excitable.
Often the TV cameras showed Mike, up in the coach’s booth high above the field, jumping out of his chair and letting fly with some rapid fist pumping.
Mike sure had enthusiasm, maybe too much of it. How long can players buy into extreme external emotion and keep it at fever pitch during 60 minutes of play (approximately 3.5-4 hours on the field)?
The unanswered question under Mike was “How do you invert that external emotion into an internal motivator for the player?
Mr. McNeill’s way is to offer steady guidance and positive feedback.
If you have the best people, you can implicitly count on them to do their best and when they mess up, remember FIDO.
In a way, the fiery locker room speech is a lack of confidence, a holding on instead of letting go. It is the coach doing the inspiring not the players from within themselves.
Mr. McNeill’s quiet enthusiasm in the coaching booth may do more for the players’ confidence than were he to run up and down, with hair on fire, fist bumping everyone in sight.
In press conferences, it is not unusual for Mr. McNeill to mention the names of his defensive coaching team and how they contribute to the defense getting better.
While many coaches (and bosses) fail to name their assistants, Mr. McNeill is deliberate in spreading confidence among his team, players and coaches.
You don’t think his positive sharing of success makes it back to the players (and the coaches)?
Of course, FIDO has relevance to the work place. When things go awry for good people, ask them to reflect, learn and move on.
Don’t stop making the extra effort; don’t cave in; don’t worry about what the boss thinks. You already know he thinks you will do the best you possibly can.
When things really click and hum along, enjoy it, reflect, and drive on.
OU plays the “Crimson Tide” of Alabama this Saturday, January 29 in the Orange Bowl down in sunny Miami, Florida.
I’ll be watching.

PS. Dec 30.
OU lost to a well balanced U of A team. After a weak start, OUs offense and defense got much better but the deficit was too great to overcome.
Apart from football, Mr. McNeill's coaching of these young men will influence them in positive ways for the rest of their lives.

__________
My book, Fables for Leaders is only a click away:


Also, My 2010 book, Leading from the Middle, is available at Amazon.

© Copyright John Lubans 2018












Krylov’s THE MONKEY AND THE SPECTACLES*

Posted by jlubans on December 22, 2018  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Drawing by Nathan Altman, 1969.

A MONKEY, which had grown weak-sighted in old age, remembered having heard men say that this was not a serious misfortune, but only made it necessary to wear glasses.
So the Monkey provided himself with half a dozen pairs of Spectacles, and after turning them this way and that, tried wearing them first on the top of his head, and then on the end of his tail, smelled of them and licked them, but all to no purpose.
The Spectacles did not help him to see any better.
"Good gracious," cried the Monkey, "what fools people are to listen to all the nonsense that they hear.
All that I have been told about Spectacles is a pack of lies.
They are not a particle of use to me!"
And hereupon the Monkey in his vexation flung the Spectacles down upon the ground so violently that they were broken to pieces.

___________
Too great an impatience and an unwillingness to ask for help just might doom one to a lonely life, not only without books, but without friends.
Of course, if you can find like- minded friends, i.e. those whom agree with your myopic view of the world, well you won’t be alone but you also won’t appreciate different perspectives.
Group think (actually un-think) is the greatest drawback I believe to human advancement, or more humbly, to an organization’s ability to roll with the punches and to take what comes and make it better.
Christmas tidings to the battlers of unthinking, the contrarians, among us!


*Source: Krilof and his fables, by Krylov, Ivan Andreevich, 1768-1844; Ralston, William Ralston Shedden, 1828-1889. Tr. London, 1869.

© Copyright John Lubans 2018

Doing by Not Doing

Posted by jlubans on December 16, 2018  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Who’s in charge?

A recent TED Talk,Lead Like the Great Conductors” by Itay Talgam claims, rightly so, that the way conductors lead is relevant to non-musical bosses.
Talgam, a former conductor, is now a self-professed “conductor of people in business.”
I’ve long been interested in the topic, e.g. my articles about how Simone Young led her orchestras when she was in Sydney, Australia and then in Hamburg, Germany. My book, Leading from the Middle, has a chapter on Simone.
I found her to be a splendid example of a collaborative conductor: her’s was a partnership with the musicians. I never observed her browbeating anyone or refusing to see an opposing view.
While she may well have been the brightest person in the room, I never got the sense that she would reject other musical views simply because she knew best.
Talgam, in the TED talk, shows via video well known successful conductors. The first is Carlos Kleiber who with his body language appears to invite the musicians’ continuous involvement in making the music. How hands off is he? Hard to tell but he does seem to enjoy very much the sound he is hearing and the musicians do see his enjoyment.
Perhaps they build on that.
I might call Kleiber’s leadership style laissez faire. If you have very good people in your organization who want freedom and accept responsibility the hands-off approach might get very good results.
In counter point, Talgam is not so impressed with conductors like the controlling Ricardo Muti, nor the distant Richard Strauss nor Herbert von Karajan, who we see with eyes closed simply enjoying the music and expecting the musicians to keep at it with zero intervention from the podium.
Muti is unquestionably an autocrat. I am not sure how to characterize in management talk the other two. But, before we dismiss the command and control conductor type, remember there are people (many or few depending on the organization) who want to be told what to do. They do not want to think for themselves - it's not in their job description, as they will remind you.
And, rehearsals would likely see a very different – versus the actual performance - musical leadership from Strauss and von Karajan. I like to think that neither conducted rehearsals with their eyes closed.
Also, I am certain Muti laid down the law as to what the sound and tempo were going to be. Any problem with that?
Talgam’s ideal conductor is “Lenny” – his nickname for his mentor - Leonard Bernstein.
Indeed Mr. Bernstein does empower his musicians so that they apparently do achieve very good music. Possibly, Mr. Bernstein is a democratic leader.
Talgam’s TED talk features a video of Lenny letting go completely, we are led to believe. He puts down his baton and simply uses facial expressions to show his delight with what he is hearing. This we are told is a perfect example of “Doing by Not Doing”, the Taoist paradox.
Talgam fails to mention the conductor-less Orpheus Chamber Orchestra (depicted above). There’s a relevant quote from Herbert von Karajan :
"The worst damage I can do to my orchestra is to give them a clear instruction. Because that would prevent the 'ensemble', the listening to each other that is needed for an orchestra."
Listening to each other is wha the egalitarian Orpheus does better than any other orchestra.
At one Orpheus rehearsal I met a student conductor. He told me that observing an Orpheus rehearsal taught him more about conducting than his classes did!
The Talgam tape of Mr. Bernstein letting go of the reins, so to speak, reminded me of something that happened when the violinist Itzhak Perlman guested one night with Orpheus at Lincoln Center.
Most guest artists enjoy playing with Orpheus since doing so gives them unprecedented freedom of expression. If there’s a conductor involved, regardless of who, there will be constraints.
Unlike Mr. Bernstein and his facial expressions, when Perlman sat out a piece - telling the audience that Orpheus was fully capable in DIY mode - he sat there, fiddled with the sheet music, pulled up his socks all the while simply enjoying the music. This was really doing by not doing!
When I show the Lincoln Center tape, some of my students fail to see this, and criticize Perlman for being a distraction. Hardly, he truly lets go and Orpheus fails him not.
Perlman looks truly apart from the music, leading by not leading at all. He sees the musicians as they are – no pandering or patronizing or permission giving.

© Copyright John Lubans 2018

Sale extended for Christmas and New Year's

Posted by jlubans on December 01, 2018  •  Leave comment (0)

Another reason to get your copy of Fables: Because it is illustrated by the illustrious Béatrice Coron! See her fabulous animated art for Dave Mathews with the songs “That Girl Is You” and “Again and Again”.
So, due to popular demand (see how easy it is to slip into advert talk?) act now and take 30% off your order of Fables for Leaders, through December, by clicking on this button:

Or, you can buy a full price copy at AMAZON.

My 2010 book, Leading from the Middle, is also available at Amazon.