Luck or Skill?

Posted by jlubans on January 13, 2022  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Lady Fortune at Her Wheel*

I recall from my undergraduate literature classes the medieval concept about Lady Fortune’s whimsies; one day you are on top (a monarch) and the next day you are a beggar, barely holding on.
The above illustration comes from a book about Boethius in which mistress “Philosophy demonstrates that Fortune rules the world and that the wise person ignores her ever-shifting ways, preferring eternal truths.”
The puzzle is knowing what’s an eternal truth.
Wilmot Kidd, an investment manager whose success rivals Warrant Buffet must have a few eternal truths to which he ascribes. When asked if his success was due to luck or skill he responded:
“Skill is just recognizing when you’ve gotten lucky.”
He explains the paradox, “It’s when you’ve been fortunate enough to make an investment in a great company, and suddenly you realize just how very lucky you were, and you buy more. That’s skill, I suppose. That—and holding on to what you have and not chickening out.”
Dwell on that.
Here’s a leader brave enough to admit luck plays a role in his success, but more so does holding on and “not chickening out.” In other words, focus on the long term over the short term gain.
I have to agree.
Were it not for chance meetings, being in the right place at the right time, I’d likely have had a different career path.
For the most part, if I had good fortune in some undertaking, I would keep doing whatever got me to the good luck part.
Looking back on my career, I had a “great ride”, as they say in NASCAR, but then one day it changed.
When it did, Fortune's Wheel from my literature classes popped into my head. I could now identify with the Sad Sack at the bottom of the wheel.
It’s not much of a stretch – for me - while contemplating the role of luck vs. skill in leadership to hark back to Arthur Conan Doyle’s sleuth extraordinaire and champion of ratiocination: the inimitable Sherlock Holmes.
Holmes had a literary competitor by the name of Paul Beck, a creation of M. McDonnell Bodkin (1850-1933).
While Sherlock Holmes was the ultimate logical reasoner, Bodkin’s Beck went a contrary (and a deliberately plodding) other way:
"I just go by the rule of thumb, and muddle and puzzle out my cases as best I can."
Nor did he minimize good luck. When congratulated by a client in solving a case he responded: “I was lucky, as usual, that's all."
Beck attributes his success to luck and common sense not ratiocination.
I’ve had the experience of not letting go of a pet idea and unwilling to change course.
Like the hedgehog in the fox and hedgehog parable I was convinced of One Big Thing and became fodder for Lady Fortune.
Unswerving allegiance to “one way” is not an eternal truth.
The flexible fox on the other hand is like Mr. Beck, willing to go with whatever rule of thumb may apply.
He enjoys a free-wheeling creativity, puzzles over possible causes, tries things, and learns from mistakes. Yet, he can be playfully inscrutable.
Ylvis and Brer Fox would agree, I think, that “Change is Fortune’s normal behavior" and change, alas, is an eternal truth.

*Detail from “Philosophy Consoling Boethius and Fortune Turning the Wheel” by Henri de Vulcop? about 1460–1470. Paris, France.

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© Copyright text by John Lubans 2022

In the Least Likely Places

Posted by jlubans on January 04, 2022  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Hallway trash swept into center of landing. Photo by Latvijas Radio.

Sometimes you find leadership in the least likely places.
Often it is ephemeral and spontaneous, but still it is leadership, that interesting human process of getting others to come along and do something for the betterment of a group, for the common good.
It is purest when spontaneous and free of organizational constraints and free of experts telling you what leadership is.
A story out of my native land of Latvia caught my eye: “Rīga residents annoyed by dirty stairwells.
It tells of many residents’ frustration with their janitorial services arrangements. “One of these residents said they had not seen a janitor for five years despite the fact that payments for janitorial services have continued to be collected from them.”
The service providers claim, as always, there are too few people who want to work as janitors and that the shortage is further aggravated by covid rules.
Pretty awful.
The story says that some “inhabitants have got sick of the dirt, so they have decided to sweep it (as depicted) into small piles to show how much has accumulated.”
Now, the landings and lobbies of most buildings from the Soviet era are already in a rundown and shabby condition, as you can see from the beat-up radiation hanging off the even more battered wall.
So, yes, the dirt piles would make a point about lack of services. But it would add to the general feeling of depression and dilapidation in the building’s entry, stairs and landings.
While common spaces may not be well maintained for historic, economic reasons, private living spaces can be charmingly decorated and nicely furnished. There’s a Latvian word for a place being just right, ”smuki”.
Why go to the effort to sweep the dirt into a pile and not just pick it up and empty it?
Why make a bad situation worse?
Is this not passive aggressive behavior among victims? Complain and do nothing?
Kind of like if I find trash on a favorite hiking trail, should I pick it up and put it in the middle of the trail? I’ve done that a few times out of irritation with the littering class but nowadays I simply pack it up and take it out.*
When I asked a Latvian friend (“V”)** if she knew of any buildings in which the owners - by the way, many of these apartments are owned, not leased - had had enough and organized into janitorial vigilantes?
She knew of none in her Riga neighborhood, but she had a friend (“L”) in the not-too-distant city of Jelgava in which the residents had self-organized and were sweeping and mopping the stairs, landings and hallways themselves. Their “block” has 11 flats on 4 floors.
Well, that was of interest.
“V” offered, most kindly, to find out more.
I learned that the venture, following a building renovation which left everything “tidy and neat”, had been organized by the “house senior” through an online vote with three options: We clean, Janitor cleans (twice a year) or Pay someone else to clean more frequently.
The outcome: We’ll do it ourselves!
This, according to “L”, “went through, because it was initiated by the ‘house senior’. Her authority played a major role. If I or another neighbour initiated that, I doubt that it would work.”
So, given the vote, each resident took responsibility to clean their landing and stairs.
While there have been some bumps over the several months, “the best result is that the staircase is clean. (A) few neighbours started making common space fancier with plants and seasonal decorations.
Some neighbours are even cleaning windows and windowsills.”
But, alas, the house senior (the leader) has moved away and things are now a bit tentative. While cleaning continues, no one is making up and posting the schedule. A recently moved in block resident may not even be aware of the communal effort.
So, this is now more a volunteer venture with less guidance/direction than previously.
“L”, after reflecting on her own cleaning efforts, would prefer to pay someone to clean. But, for that to happen will require agreement among the other tenants/owners.
So, will this arrangement come to a slow and grinding halt like in Riga?
There is a glimmer of hope: The “neighbour from the 2nd floor voluntarily decided that she will constantly clean the 1st floor” (in addition to her 2nd floor bailiwick).
The folks on the 1st floor “are elderly people with physical disabilities”. A consideration in her generosity is that “she has huge husky dog with plenty of fur that makes some extra dirt. Maybe, considering this factor (inner guilt) or due to diligent nature she voluntarily makes this extra effort.”
Will the 2nd floor neighbor carry on the initiative started by the “house senior”?
There may be other options besides Riga’s sweeping the dirt into the middle of the floor – such as finding and employing someone – but exploring those options will require time and effort.
Perhaps it is time for “L’s” vigilante janitors to meet in person to reflect on – indeed celebrate - their accomplishments and to decide next steps.

*Speaking of hiking trails, I am reminded of an organized clean up campaign to change dog owner behavior in one of the Oregon State University forests. You can read it here: “Dog Poop and Problem Solving

**Acknowledgement: Many thanks to friend and colleague “V” for identifying and interviewing “L” and for translating.

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© Copyright text by John Lubans 2022

Cage Free Management

Posted by jlubans on December 27, 2021  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Henny Penny (left) keeping her distance in the pasture.

I recently made up a term for a kind of management system or style: cage free.
It was a re-purposing of a term found on an egg carton. As you know nowadays there’s more than one way, including “gluten-free” to market eggs. (There's no gluten in eggs.)
For me, it was a catch phrase* to suggest a better, a new and improved supervisory style superior to ye olde micro-management.
The cage free manager is one prone to let go, to give more range for decision making by the worker.
Well, yes.
But, it turns out - as often happens with management theory - cage free is but a tiny step up from caged management.
Instead of the 93 square inches provided caged birds, cage free gives the hen a bit more indoor space but no access to the out of doors.
While not as felicitous sounding, I should have said: “Pasture-raised management”.
Pasture-raised gives the hen the freedom to roam inside and outside with a cozy covered coop to roost in at day’s end. Of course, the risk from predators is elevated. Risk that effects to both the hen and the farmer or the worker and the supervisor.
The term pasture-raised offers a greater freedom, as depicted with Henny Penny out there with horses and other hens, and almost zero supervision by a manager.
Generally, eggs produced by pasture-raised hens differ markedly- for the better - in color (orangey yolk), size (larger) and flavor. Happy hens.
Well, if there’s any analogy, we do want happy workers, don’t we? Is that not the bailiwick of the “happiness engineers” to be found in the wokest of woke enterprises?
Like so much in human relationships, it depends.
Still, I’ll take pasture raised over the caged option.

*Joining my facetious gluten free management style of the Neo-Boss.

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Not a Mushroom*

Posted by jlubans on December 20, 2021  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: My Christmas Cactus, December 16 2021

It’s amazing what some plants (and people) will do when left alone.
It’s been two years since my Christmas cactus last blossomed. I’d pretty much given up, even gave serious thought (for about 5 minutes) to following the popular gardening advice of covering the plant with a black bag for a dozen hours each day for 6-8 weeks. Too much trouble.
Instead, I let it do its own thing. Gloriously.
Of course, I kept the plant in a temperate zone. I watered it. I talked to it, and lifted its stems to see how it was feeling.
But, the blossoming was all up to the plant.
What about people in the workplace?
A few can be left alone with minimal guidance and support. They are the self-directed. The last thing they needed from me was micromanagement. When they produced, it was like the cactus blossoms in the picture.
However, my favored technique of leaving people alone just did not work with everyone, especially those who needed daily supervision and guidance.
So, as much as I preferred “cage-free” management, my personal style of supervision did not fit all.
While some responded well to my feedback – when I offered it - others simply went on as always regardless of my efforts to inspire or motivate.
Their performance was adequate but hardly thrilling.
The leader’s job is to “know” when to intervene and who to leave alone.
What did I “know” about the Christmas cactus? Enough to let it go its own way.
I suspect most office workers would benefit from a little prompting. Some, from a lot. And, if this latter group protests the increased oversight, well, that may be the necessary push for them to move on and find a better fit elsewhere.
Had I applied the suggested cactus regimen to some of my recalcitrants: keep them in a dark place with a bag over their heads, limit water and lower the temperature, I’d be sure to have
HR knocking on my door – for once, for good cause.

*As in “they keep us in the dark and feed us shit”, a meme of the modern office.

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Lessing’s THE BRAMBLE

Posted by jlubans on December 12, 2021  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: “Please, please don’t throw me in the briar patch"


“WILL you kindly explain," said the Willow to the Bramble, "why you are so eager to seize hold of the clothes of every man, woman or child that passes by?
Of what use can their clothes possibly be to you?"
"Of no use," said the Bramble.
"Neither do I wish to take the clothes from them. I only want to tear them."
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Brother Bramble’s in need of an imagine make over? Or, an esteem booster.
What of the shelter he provides to the wee creature fleeing from the baying hound or the screaming hawk?
It’s his tearing of clothes and flesh that protects the weak and denies the brute.

*SOURCE: Lessing, Fables, Book II, No. 27. Translated by G. Moir Bussey.Excerpted From: Cooper, Frederic Taber, 1864-1937. “An argosy of fables; a representative selection from the fable literature of every age and land.” New York: Frederick A. Stokes Company. 1921.

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SAFETY FIRST

Posted by jlubans on December 06, 2021  •  Leave comment (0)

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For years, many American towns have accommodated citizens who underestimate children’s ability to understand risk, who overestimate the danger in something like monkey bars and who suspect trial lawyers lurk in every playground hedge.
As recently as 2019, a family won a $170,000 settlement because their daughter broke her arm falling off the school playground slide.
Why the award?
Because the slide's incline was “too steep" at 35%, albeit well within the standard 30-45%.
One school got rid of all swings, having declared them as “the most unsafe of … playground equipment."
Apparently, they’d already gotten rid of the merry-go-rounds, see-saws, and monkey bars.
Well, in Europe there’s a movement to reclaim risk in playgrounds.
Horrors!
There’s a reason they are doing this: It goes back to 2004. Research then found that "children who had improved their motor skills in playgrounds at an early age were less likely to suffer accidents as they got older."
The headline of a recent article on this proclaims: “German Insurance Companies Demand Perilous Playgrounds ….”
So, what does this have to do with the workplace?
How much social or intellectual risk are we willing to accept in the office?
How much is any decision we make influenced by the risk of offending one group or another.
I am not talking about discarding safe building and fire codes; I am talking about the risk of speaking up instead of sitting mum when the boss has a bad idea or when, in my case, library clients and staff – even publishers and scholarly societies, actively censor opposing views.
In my most recent blog, I refer to my asking a colleague newly returned from a training workshop “Were you challenged?”
What I meant to ask was, Did you question some of your preset ideas?
Did you change your thinking or was everything you believed simply corroborated?
Was your comfort level made uneasy?
Well, of course not!
The workshop was deliberately designed to be “safe”, to be risk free.
Contrarian ideas were eschewed right at the start. Who wants to be ostracized for heretical views?
There’s not much physical risk in most offices, but there is a different kind of risk versus climbing a tree.
It’s the intellectual risk of going against the established “canon”, the risk of alienating peers by taking the opposing view, the risk of using common sense instead of what is deemed safe and correct.
And, there’s the bizarre - for too many - notion, on some campuses and in some corporations, that people can be trusted to do what is right; they do not need guidance or coercion; they will opt to do what is best.

20130424-JLmakingit.jpeg
Caption: Me, on a DITW, struggling to the top!.

Back in my management days, I often promoted and participated in “Days in the Woods” (DITWs).
These excursions were in pursuit of something similar to what those German insurance companies want: risk competence.
As they say, “If we want children to be prepared for risk, we need to allow them to come into contact with risk.”
Well, the same can be said for adults.
The DITWs were voluntary adventures outside of the office: rock climbing, high ropes, orienteering, river rafting, etc.
Over two years, about 20% of the staff attended - mostly from those units I supervised; some said “No way!” and thought these were inappropriate for office workers.
A few of us reasoned that taking workers out of the usual environment would result in
1. A gain in the individual’s appreciation of his or her strengths through overcoming (or, let’s be frank, failing at) seemingly daunting challenges and
2. The formation of trusting relationships among participants – call it genuine team building - and new, positive, ways of looking at and relating to colleagues.
There is a third outcome: a personal awareness of Nature’s potential for consolation; the forest and river as a place for solace and calm.
There was “perceived risk” in these DITWs – scaling a 50-foot rock outcropping with a rope – however safely secured – is scary for most of us.
In recognition of (and appreciation of) the risk, everyone signed off on a liability waiver agreeing not to sue the organization should they be injured.
Obviously, these waivers did not exempt the organization from doing all it could do to minimize real risk.
Some in the administration -my higher- ups - thought less of the risk to individuals than they believed that this was a waste of precious work time.
Naturally, I was taking a professional risk simply by promoting this type of activity.
What the nay-sayers failed to understand was that just like in those “perilous playgrounds” this was a chance to “recognize (assess) and mititgate risk” to achieve some level of risk competence. Remember that in this organization, like so many others, risk was something to be avoided.
An overly “safe” environment results in tame workers, ones reluctant to protest poor decisions made by the ruling class or to even try new ways of doing something.
Is there a a culprit for overly safe organizations?
HR plays a prominent sanitation role. They are much about risk mitigation – just like those who want to remove dangerous playground equipment, they are ever ready to anticipate what might be, invariably, the worst case.
And, instead of the lurking trial lawyer, for HR it’s the labor lawyer who is looking to sue organizations for un-safe or un-diverse or un-woke working environments.
Yes, safety first always, but with knowledge that risk when understood and dealt with is something that helps us grow.

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No supply-chain issues here! My books are all American, so when you buy my latest book of workplace fables you can expect speedy delivery. Something to keep in mind as the gift giving season arrives.
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© Copyright text and photo by John Lubans 2021

“Louder and Funnier”*

Posted by jlubans on November 25, 2021  •  Leave comment (0)

20130821-homerxandy.jpg
Caption: Homer NOT Stepping Up.

The title* suggests the complexities of motivation. Yes, most of us can speak louder. But, funnier?, that’s more of a challenge.
The funnier has to be there, waiting to be released. If not there, no matter the audience’s heckling, it’s not going to happen.
So it is with motivation in the workplace.
Telling someone to be funnier is like telling them to be more creative or more innovative.
We all know that fear will get some results but they are short term. For long term results, something other than fear has to be the trigger.
How does a manager/leader prepare her reports for “stepping up” – which, as illustrated, Homer is not doing so well.
We can hope to motivate others by example. Maybe.
We can try to motivate through exhortation. Maybe.
How we try to motivate depends on where we think motivation comes from. Is it external to the worker? Or is it internal? I believe it is always the latter and managers get to figure out ways to trigger that motivation and the talent in the individual.
My long-held view is that leaders can release creativity – if it is there – we cannot kick it out of someone.
We can and should prepare staff to “rise to the occasion”. How do we do that?
Well, for one thing, we make sure the tools and supports are in place. The worker is trained and able to do what is called for.
He is ready to step in and take on the challenge.
The permission to fail - tacit or explicit – is integral to my formula.
Pardon the sports analogy, but sports teams give us microscopic insight to preparing someone to step up.
Getting a player to the next level is not a “gut check” regardless of what sports writers tell you; it is putting or letting loose what you know (your skill and talent) and what you have learned from repetition in practice into the actual game.
In American football there are coaches for every position; players are divided into “rooms”, quarterbacks, running backs, receivers, defensive linesmen, offensive linesmen, kickers, etc. Each room has at least one full time coach!
Imagine the cost (and benefit) if we did that in the workplace.
Each coach is an expert and is exclusively focused on the individuals in that “room”, preparing each player to not only start but to be ready to step in and up.
At the elite level, the so-called “second string” is only a percentage point less capable than the starter.
In some programs, players are rotated in and out after so many “snaps” of the ball in a game. Not only does this assure less fatigue among starters but the practice creates elite substitutes; there’s no drop off when a back-up comes in for the starter.
Were you challenged?
The was my question to a recently returned staffer from a several-days training program.
She looked at me as if I were asking if she had endured survival training.
For her the training was all academic; it neither prepared her for a leadership role nor did it lead to self-reflection on leading.
Others in that meeting were just as puzzled as to my meaning about challenge. I was asking – however cryptically - what had changed about her; had she wrestled with the difficult concept of leading others, etc.
Had she emerged from the training crucible stronger than when she went in?
Seemingly, the “same old, same old” was good enough for her.
Training completed, she’d checked off that box.

*Louder and Funnier is the title of a collection of essays by P.G. Wodehouse published in 1932
The title derives from a nervous after-dinner speaker being asked to speak louder, then a voice pipes up, “Louder, please”, it observed. “and funnier.” Wodehouse concludes, “One is left to suppose the speaker did his best to oblige, as I have done (in this collection).”

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No supply-chain issues here! My books are all American, so when you buy my latest book of workplace fables you can expect speedy delivery. Something to keep in mind as the gift giving season arrives.
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And, don’t forget my book on democratic workplaces, Leading from the Middle

© Copyright text by John Lubans 2021

Lessing’s THE WILD APPLE-TREE

Posted by jlubans on November 19, 2021  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Christmas ornament on wild apple-tree, July 2021

A SWARM of Bees settled and built their hive in the hollow trunk of a Wild Apple-Tree.
They soon filled the hollow with the treasures of their Honey, and the Wild Apple-Tree became so proud in consequence that it looked down contemptuously upon all its neighbours.
Hereupon a Rose-Bush thus addressed the Tree:
"Truly, yours is a poor sort of pride that bases itself upon borrowed sweetness!
Is your miserable fruit any the less bitter because the Bees have made their home in your hollow trunk?
Sweeten it then with their honey, if you can; for not until then will you be of any value to Mankind!"
____________
I’m reminded of some
research library colleagues who worked in top-ranked universities.
Like the apple-tree, they were happy to be on campus, content to be on the rim of the bubbling crucible of innovation and scholarship, and to bask in the ambiance reflected from those inventing and innovating. Indeed, a "poor sort of (borrowed) pride."
However, what they contributed was more about maintaining than originating.
Change was reactive and imitative, usually following coercion external to the organization.
For me, regardless of the library’s rank it was important to do our own share of innovation and scholarship.
I was blessed that I had, for the most part, supportive bosses who gave me freedom and encouragement to do just that and to spread it far and wide.

*SOURCE: Lessing, Fables, Book II, No. 25. Translated by G. Moir Bussey.Excerpted From: Cooper, Frederic Taber, 1864-1937. “An argosy of fables; a representative selection from the fable literature of every age and land.” New York: Frederick A. Stokes Company. 1921.
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20% off Through December 31 2021
No supply-chain issues here! My books are all American, so when you buy my latest book of workplace fables you can expect speedy delivery. Something to keep in mind as the gift giving season looms.
And, of course, there's no memory chip shortages for printed books :))

And, don’t forget my book on democratic workplaces, Leading from the Middle

© Copyright photo and text by John Lubans 2021

Lessing’s THE BLIND HEN*

Posted by jlubans on November 13, 2021  •  Leave comment (0)

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Caption: Henny Penny 2018

A HEN who had lost her sight, and was accustomed to scratching up the earth in search of food, although blind, still continued to scratch away most diligently.
Of what use was it to the industrious fool?
Another sharp-sighted hen who spared her tender feet, never budged from her side, and enjoyed, without scratching, the fruit of the other's labour.
For as often as the Blind Hen scratched up a barleycorn, her watchful companion devoured it.

_________
Do you think Lessing, in this fable, is suggesting that the cunning hen is right in exploiting the blind hen?
Do you think he would extend this exploitation to humans?
For Lessing, the blind hen is an “industrious fool”; and what of the “sharp sighted” hen?
An enterprising fowl. The able taking advantage of the disabled.
Or, worse, not only taking advantage but speeding up the blind hen’s starvation.
With a bit of kindness – also known in evolutionary science as cooperation and collaboration – these two could become a tag team, sharing what’s found.
My blogs on Tom the Turkey and Henny Penny
depict the animal world’s pecking orders.
We like to think humans are above this dog-eat-dog mindset, but, each of us probably can identify how some humans are not far removed from animal level cruelty.
Routinely, the anti-social media erupts with fits of human hatred.
Social pathologues, while few in number, despise those with different world views and willingly seek to stifle and persecute the “other”.
Fortunately, many more humans tend to cooperate, collaborate and to exhibit kindness and fairness.

*SOURCE: Lessing, Fables, Book I, No. 30. Translated by G. Moir Bussey.
Excerpted From: Cooper, Frederic Taber, 1864-1937. “An argosy of fables; a representative selection from the fable literature of every age and land.” New York: Frederick A. Stokes Company. 1921.

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20% off Through December 31 2021
No supply-chain issues here! My books are all American, so when you buy my latest book of workplace fables you can expect speedy delivery. Something to keep in mind as the gift giving season looms.
And, of course, there's no memory chip shortages for printed books :))

And, don’t forget my book on democratic workplaces, Leading from the Middle

© Copyright text and photo John Lubans 2021

Cheesy Performance Appraisal

Posted by jlubans on November 09, 2021  •  Leave comment (0)

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Recently, the WSJ featured an in-depth story on how the Cheesecake Factory restaurant chain survived the epidemic’s restrictions and shut downs.
What tweaked my interest even more than the survival aspect were the 42 suggestions from the Factory’s 500-page operations manual to describe its signature cheesecake deserts.
Words and phrases like “Amazing”, “Chewy”, “Extraordinary”, and “Out of this world” reminded me of the Beer Wheel at the Deschutes Brewery in Bend, Oregon. There, the Beer Wheel is used to identify unique flavors in their several beers. I adapted the wheel, semi- facetiously, to performance appraisal (PA) systems which remain all the rage in corporate America.
(Parenthetically, how is PA going to be conducted for the millions working from home? After all, in some organizations PA is the one thing which elevates the manager above the worker.)
Now, I am not sure if the Factory requires performance appraisal for its workers but the door stopper of an operations manual suggests a strong probability.
The WSJ tells us that the operations manual includes “roughly a full page of rules for the handling of strawberries for its cakes and a 12-step breakdown for hot tea service.”
Whether they do or don’t, here are some of the 42 cheescake terms applied to the traditional and ubiquitous five category scale of corporate PA.
5. Exceptional: Unbelievable, Heavenly, Yum-a-licious
4. Exceeds Expectations: Tart, Mouthwatering, Layered
3. Meets Expectations: Baked, Drizzled, Full, Covered
2. Improvement Needed: Chunky, Dripping, Sinful, Oozing
1. Unsatisfactory: Crispy, Decadent, Gooey, Loaded
Yes, I know, just like in the bizness world some of these terms, like “gooey” and “oozing”, are interchangeable and could be used at either levels 1 or 2.
Or, if you are a boss who likes his workers gooey and oozing, you might want to save these terms for categories 5 and 4.
So, there you have a helpful guide, augmenting the Beer Wheel, for conducting your next appraisal.
If your use of the Factory’s terms gets you in trouble with the boss or the policy makers in your organization who love PA but exempt themselves from the dreaded ritual, console yourself at the nearest Cheesecake Factory store.
We have it from a very good source that their cheesecake is Yummy and Scrumptious, indeed, Fantastic.
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No supply-chain issues here! My books are printed and shipped in the USA, so when you buy my latest book of workplace fables you can expect speedy delivery. Something to keep in mind as the gift giving season looms.
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© Copyright all text John Lubans 2021