Phaedrus' “THE WOMAN IN LABOUR”*

Posted by jlubans on January 23, 2019

No one returns with good will to the place which has done him a mischief.
Her months completed, a Woman in labour lay upon the ground, uttering woeful moans.
Her Husband entreated her to lay her body on the bed, where she might with more ease deposit her ripe burden.
“I feel far from confident,” said she, “that my pains can end in the place where they originated.”
________
Alas, this one did not make it into the Children's Classics of Aesop’s Fables by L'Estrange (1692) more recently published by Knopf in a beautiful hard cover series, the Everyman’s Library.
Imagine the titters from the little ones had it been included, as several rather outré ones were.
For example, there’s L'Estrange’s “JUPITER AND MODESTY” which speaks of “ carnal love” and, his AN APE “(bare-arse”) AND A FOX
Last but not least, there's the pissing donkeys fable certain to prompt a wave of giggling in the nursery?
I can relate to the promythium moral, “one does not return with good will to the place which has done him a mischief”.
An institution with which I parted ways, involuntarily, did not see me back for 15 years and then only because one of my students arranged a tour. I went for an hour and that was the end of it.
While nothing like giving birth, some say getting the boot at work stays with you for a long, long time with nothing to show for it, unlike a sweet, darling child.

*Source: THE COMEDIES OF TERENCE AND THE FABLES OF PHÆDRUS.
TRANSLATED By HENRY THOMAS RILEY, B.A.
TO WHICH IS ADDED A METRICAL TRANSLATION OF PHÆDRUS,
By CHRISTOPHER SMART.
LONDON: GEORGE BELL & SONS, 1887.

© Copyright John Lubans 2019



« Prev itemNext item »

Comments

No comments yet. You can be the first!

Leave comment