Friday Fable. Phaedrus’ “THE WOLF AND FOX, WITH THE APE FOR JUDGE”*

Posted by jlubans on February 09, 2018

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Caption: Illustration by Percy J. Billinghurst (1871 -1933)

Whoe’er by practice indiscreet
Has pass’d for a notorious cheat,
Will shortly find his credit fail,

Though he speak truth, says Esop’s tale.
The Wolf the Fox for theft arraign’d;
The Fox her innocence maintain’d:
The Ape, as umpire, takes his seat;
Each pleads his cause with skill and heat.
Then thus the Ape, with aspect grave,
The sentence from the hustings gave:
“For you, Sir Wolf, I do descry
That all your losses are a lie—
And you, with negatives so stout,
O Fox! have stolen the goods no doubt.”

_____________
And so it can be at work.
If you are a lowdown, deceitful, conniving, treacherous double dealer, well what would you expect your work mates to think when you do something right? (“Can’t Even Do Wrong Right” comes to mind)
Or, as one moralist puts it: “The dishonest, if they act honestly, get no credit.”


*Source: The Fables of Phaedrus Translated into English Verse. Phaedrus. Christopher Smart, A. M. London. G. Bell and Sons, Ltd. 1913.

© Copyright John Lubans 2018

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