Friday Fable: Aesop’s THE MULE*

Posted by jlubans on March 13, 2014

20140314-mule1.jpg
Caption: In Halcyon Days!
“One morning a Mule, who had too much to eat and too little to do, began to think himself a very fine fellow indeed, and frisked about saying, ‘My father was undoubtedly a high-spirited horse and I take after him entirely.’ But very soon afterwards he was put into the harness and compelled to go a very long way with a heavy load behind him. At the end of the day, exhausted by his unusual exertions, he said dejectedly to himself, ‘I must have been mistaken about my father; he can only have been an ass after all.’”
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Caption: In desperate need of Mulliner's Buck-u-Uppo

And so it is at work when bragging and braying reveals an unflattering side of one’s nature. Best to rein in our braggart-self on the good days since there’s bound to be a bad day on the near horizon. Rather, tuck away the good times for reflection when the hay turns sour and the well water goes bad.
Take note of the circumspect farmer who knows better than to tempt fate. He never has a good year. At best, with barns bursting with bounty, he remarks, “Aye, it’s a bit better than last year.” Last year was a famine.

*Source: AESOP'S FABLES A NEW TRANSLATION BY V. S. VERNON JONES WITH AN INTRODUCTION By G. K. CHESTERTON AND ILLUSTRATIONS BY ARTHUR RACKHAM (Publisher: London: W. Heinemann; New York: Doubleday, Page & Co., 1912). Available at Gutenberg.

Friday’s Leading from the Middle Library: 
American University's Bender Library. Washington, D.C.


@Copyright John Lubans 2014



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