Ernest Griset’s THE WOLF AND THE SHEPHERDS* Redux.

Posted by jlubans on May 12, 2021

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Caption: Griset’s (1844-1907) very own illustration.

A Wolf peeping into a hut where a company of Shepherds were regaling themselves on a leg of mutton, exclaimed, "What a clamour these fellows would have raised if they had caught me at such a banquet!"
Men, forsooth, are apt to condemn in others what they practice themselves without scruple.
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I first posted this fable – all about hypocrisy - in late 2019.
Have you noticed that much of the daily parade of commentary on FCBK and other anti-social media - whenever it strays from cats, dogs, grandkids, flowers and vacation photos - is, as I put it a while back, “ignorant, one-sided, negative, absolutely certain, ill-humored, repetitive (think ‘meme’ and ‘sharing’) and unforgiving?”
Today’s moral, “Men, forsooth, are apt to condemn in others what they practice themselves without scruple” is especially relevant right now.
I can justify objectionable behavior by people I like but become outraged when it’s perpetrated by people I despise.
Aesop speaks to this in his Jupiter and the Two Sacks fable. We each wear two sacks – one visibly on the front of other’s people’s faults and a sack on the back – out of sight - full of our own failings.

*Source: Aesop's fables by Aesop; Griset, Ernest Henry, 1844-1907
London ; New York : Cassell, Petter, and Galpin 1874

© Copyright John Lubans 2021

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